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Old 09-22-2018, 10:07 PM   #1
Svenska_Monokrom
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Default Bolts snapped off in block from engine mounting.

So I turn to here for some advice on this.

So basically I have a failed engine mount, but the block of rubber itself isn't failed. The bracket that holds it in place I broke at the block.

The bolts for that bracket snapped off and left the rest of them imbedded in the block.

I'm just trying to get some ideas on how to get those bolts out of the block so I can reinstall the bracket properly. I know those cheap little stripper bolt removal tools work sometimes but we want a method that would cause as little damage to the block as possible. A new engine is not an option for us right now.

I suck at explaining things so feel free to ask for some clarification.
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Old 09-22-2018, 10:13 PM   #2
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easiest way will be to weld a bolt to them and get them out.

Ezout usually sucks in best of conditions
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Old 09-22-2018, 10:23 PM   #3
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Can you post some pictures of the broken bolts in the block?
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Old 09-22-2018, 10:28 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack View Post
easiest way will be to weld a bolt to them and get them out.


No, that will not be an easy way.

These work great if there is anything left to grab onto.

Otherwise, you'll need:
- a center punch
- a right angle drill (these are available in electric if you don't have a compressor)
- left handed drill bits
- a good light

But, to be honest... If it's just one side you'll likely come out on top financially having a shop repair it if you have none of the requisite tools on hand for extraction.

Last edited by swedefiend; 09-22-2018 at 11:53 PM.. Reason: Home cheapo won't let me make a 'clean' link...
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Old 09-22-2018, 10:34 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swedefiend View Post


No, that will not be an easy way.

These work great if there is anything left to grab onto.

Otherwise, you'll need:
- a center punch
- a right angle drill (these are available in electric if you don't have a compressor)
- left handed drill bits
- a good light

But, to be honest... If it's just one side you'll likely come out on top financially having a shop repair it if you have none of the requisite tools on hand for extraction.

Super easy... when you pay someone to do it...


Extracting broken bolts using a welder is a whole lot easier than drill and try to get a seized bolt out
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Old 09-22-2018, 10:38 PM   #6
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Super easy... when you pay someone to do it...


Extracting broken bolts using a welder is a whole lot easier than drill and try to get a seized bolt out
IF you have a lift, and a welder and...

FWIW, my welds are sufficient for towing twenty thousand pounds of freight. But, welding a bolt onto a broken bolt would not be my go-to solution
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Old 09-22-2018, 10:41 PM   #7
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Reacharound from top... weld doesn’t have to be good either. Point to it is the broken bolt gets super hot and loosens up. You then just back it out with welded on smaller bolt or nut.
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Old 09-22-2018, 10:47 PM   #8
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Nuts work best, even with a broken easy out.

.
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Old 09-22-2018, 11:12 PM   #9
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Alright so to answer back to alot of the replies here because I know I kept it sort of vague (my bad).

-The bolts are broken off flush with the block so there's not much at all outside to grab on to, I'd assume that may make welding a bit difficult too.

-We don't have a welder or know anyone local who would be willing to let us use one

-We thought about just drilling out the end of the bolts and then breaking them out but we're hoping for some easier alternatives.

And then as for a picture, it may be poor but it's a awkward place to squeeze a phone into:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/GKe5Gc7dDnxkbpEz5

Sorry, replying from work, thank you all for replying.
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Old 09-22-2018, 11:15 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack View Post
Reacharound from top... weld doesn’t have to be good either. Point to it is the broken bolt gets super hot and loosens up. You then just back it out with welded on smaller bolt or nut.
Okay Jack. Will have to keep the nut trick for desperation.

One last thing though... Ideally, you would heat the block and cool the bolt / stud. That would be in an imaginary world though.

Heating the bolt only helps if you can cold quench it (that's what we do to get stubborn bearing races out of industrial axles... Heat race until at least half is glowing and then throw in a wet rag. Dodge the steam, then remove race with the rag

^^^ I DO NOT recommend that solution here. It will make the block brittle.
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Old 09-22-2018, 11:38 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiperfauto View Post
Nuts work best, even with a broken easy out.

.
I dont have a brother holding my nut in place while I "just the tip"


nut is easier because you contain the weld inside of it but I also like to use a size smaller bolt ground at an angle on flat/recessed broken studs/bolts
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Old 09-23-2018, 12:27 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Svenska_Monokrom View Post
-We thought about just drilling out the end of the bolts and then breaking them out but we're hoping for some easier alternatives.
My drilling solution does not involve "breaking them out".

The left handed drill bits can be bought at Northern Tool or possibly even Harbor Freight.

The left handed drill bit usually removes the broken bolt (unless it is actually seized).

It is important to get the bit centered though because you may need two or three different size bits to finally get the bolt to start coming out.
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Old 09-23-2018, 12:31 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swedefiend View Post
My drilling solution does not involve "breaking them out".

The left handed drill bits can be bought at Northern Tool or possibly even Harbor Freight.

The left handed drill bit usually removes the broken bolt (unless it is actually seized).

It is important to get the bit centered though because you may need two or three different size bits to finally get the bolt to start coming out.
Ah ok, sorry I didn't quite understand what a left hand drill bit was, I searched it up.

I might try that, I don't believe the bolts are seized so maybe it might work? I see harbor freight has a set for about 9 dollars.
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Old 09-23-2018, 12:36 AM   #14
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Here is a write-up using the drill method.

Here is a write-up using the welding method.
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Old 09-23-2018, 01:23 AM   #15
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The bracket just snapped? Any chance the remains of the bolts aren't particularly tight (now that the "pulling" force on the threads is gone), and a sharp center-punch or chisel and hammer might tap-tap-tap them around and out? Or have you already tried that?

One of many Youtube demos 2:28 - 4:02 ...
https://youtu.be/_R1b8niX13w?t=148
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Old 09-23-2018, 01:37 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MasterBlaster View Post
The bracket just snapped? Any chance the remains of the bolts aren't particularly tight (now that the "pulling" force on the threads is gone), and a sharp center-punch or chisel and hammer might tap-tap-tap them around and out? Or have you already tried that?

One of many Youtube demos 2:28 - 4:02 ...
https://youtu.be/_R1b8niX13w?t=148
We haven't really touched it yet but we have thought of that, ideally the remains of the bolts should be pretty loose (my car has a tendency of killing engine mounts).

We plan on attacking the issue tommorow with everything we've read here. Starting from simple to complicated.
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Old 09-23-2018, 06:40 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiperfauto View Post
Nuts work best, even with a broken easy out.

.
X2. I was amazed how well this worked. It might help to put a washer under the nut.
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Old 09-23-2018, 09:10 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Sjeng View Post
X2. I was amazed how well this worked. It might help to put a washer under the nut.

I have used the welding nut method many of times. Its my go to before I reach for the drill. What I do is get a washer with the I.D. the same as the bolt or a tad smaller. Weld the washer in place and then weld my nut to the washer from the inside of the nut.
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Old 09-23-2018, 10:12 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Dadssleeper View Post
I have used the welding nut method many of times. Its my go to before I reach for the drill. What I do is get a washer with the I.D. the same as the bolt or a tad smaller. Weld the washer in place and then weld my nut to the washer from the inside of the nut.
If you guys have all of that material left to add washers and nuts and then weld on, then you're doing it wrong...

Because, these things work great!



^I linked to a set of these earlier but I know you lot are too lazy to look. So, here's an exemplar.
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Old 09-23-2018, 10:24 AM   #20
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OP, try to turn what's left of the bolt with a punch. I've also gotten lucky enough on the past to have the sharp part of the broken bolt get stuck in my glove (Atlas gloves have a sort of rubber coating on the palm and fingertips) and start turning that way.

Good luck!

Last edited by swedefiend; 09-23-2018 at 10:53 AM..
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Old 09-23-2018, 10:32 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swedefiend View Post
^I linked to a set of these earlier but I know you lot are too lazy to look. So, here's an exemplar.
Your link 404's, maybe you should check it before throwing shade.

I'll throw you a bone so we can both save face.
Gear Wrench 41760D
https://www.amazon.com/GearWrench-41.../dp/B000K1KHB6

Assenmacher makes a good set too.

Hoping OP comes back with some positive news before this thread gets locked.

Last edited by MDVLN; 09-23-2018 at 10:38 AM..
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Old 09-23-2018, 10:44 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by MDVLN View Post
Your link 404's, maybe you should check it before throwing shade.

I'll throw you a bone so we can both save face.
Gear Wrench 41760D
https://www.amazon.com/GearWrench-41.../dp/B000K1KHB6

Assenmacher makes a good set too.

Hoping OP comes back with some positive news before this thread gets locked.
The original link 404d (the quoted one in post #5).

My edited link (in post #4) works from here

Oh, and mine are MAC
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Old 09-23-2018, 11:35 AM   #23
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Looks like OP doesn't have enough material there for the linked tool. I second left hand drill bits but OP needs to be right on center. OP look at the other mounting bolts so you have an idea how much material is left in the block. Spray some brake cleaner in that area so your not working on slippery surfaces.
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Old 09-23-2018, 12:42 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dadssleeper View Post
I have used the welding nut method many of times. Its my go to before I reach for the drill. What I do is get a washer with the I.D. the same as the bolt or a tad smaller. Weld the washer in place and then weld my nut to the washer from the inside of the nut.
thats a good idea

Quote:
Originally Posted by swedefiend View Post
If you guys have all of that material left to add washers and nuts and then weld on, then you're doing it wrong...

didnt even know about welding until yesterday but today is an expert
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Old 09-23-2018, 05:20 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack View Post
thats a good idea



didnt even know about welding until yesterday but today is an expert
Jack is the expert. Because he says he is.

You'll have to join my haters club Jack. I'm good at nearly everything I set my hand to

Last edited by swedefiend; 09-23-2018 at 05:40 PM..
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